O (Omicron)

O (Omicron)

O (Omicron)
A permanent installation directed by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
Hala Stulecia, Wroclaw, Poland.

Last year, we were approached to create our first permanent installation for the new museum of architecture of Hala Stulecia, in Wroclaw, Poland. The piece – that we called O (Omicron), is actually the last part of the visit, and a way to create a link between the rich history of the building and the present times, by turning this massive concrete structure into a lively architecture.

When opened, Hala Stulecia was the largest reinforced concrete structure in the world. With a diameter of 65m it was home to the largest dome built since the Pantheon in Rome eighteen centuries earlier.
The Centennial Hall was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006.

It is reasonable to think that when Hala Stulecia was built in 1913 Max Berg’s ambition for his construction was to pass the test of time. What could have been his vision of the monument in the distant future? How did he imagine the olding of the materials? The evolution of the surrounding urbanism and populations?

The piece proposed for the Centennial Hall of Wroclaw is based around the notion of timelessness in architecture, and the idea of what future has meant throughout the 20th century.

Taking the 1910’s as a starting point (the dome was erected in 1913), historical and artistic references were used to reveal the architecture of the space, its timeless and, more surprisingly, very modern dimension.

A deliberately minimalist visual aesthetic allowed to highlight the very architecture of Hala Stulecia’s dome and re-affirm its place at the core of the piece. Minimalism also appeared to be the most appropriate means of conveying this idea of future at different periods of time (from 20’s/30’s anticipation film to more contemporary productions ). But the use of these references was not simply formal: the vision of futuristic totalitarian societies seemed to echo back real moments in the history of the building, warning us against the dangers of an idealized vision of the future.

Inspiration for the music composed by Thomas for this project was found in both orchestral work, echoing the colossal size of the architecture, and electronic textures, evoking the action of time. The score also tried and recreate a sense of evolution of the materials used for the dome structure, and their sonic aging.

By using references such as Fritz Lang’s Metropolis or the utopian projects of Archigram to confront the different visions of the future at different times, we were interested in trying to create a vision of a future with no precise time reference. A timeless future.


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DIRECTED by Romain Tardy & Thomas Vaquié
ARCHITECTURE by Max Berg (1913)
VISUALS by Romain Tardy, Guillaume Cottet
MUSIC composed by Thomas Vaquié
2D / 3D MAPPING by Joanie Lemercier, Romain Tardy
MANAGEMENT & PRODUCTION Nicolas Boritch
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Filmed by Jerome Monnot, Joanie Lemercier, Romain Tardy
Edited by Jerome Monnot
 

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53 Comments

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  • Bertrand.F on Dec 09, 2012

    Bravo pour votre travail…

  • Miranda on Sep 05, 2012

    Wow, Thats Massive installation, would like to have more details on how it has been done. BTW its looking awesome.

  • kikko on Aug 26, 2012

    Trés bon projet et excellente documentation. Bravo!

  • marika on Jul 27, 2012

    come to lyon for the illuminations! venez faire les illuminations de lyon ça serait génial avec vos idées! BRAVO<!

  • romain on Jul 26, 2012

    GRANDIOSE…

  • edison on Jun 27, 2012

    “O” is Amazing artistry.
    Thank you for revealing such beauty.

  • Paul on Jun 26, 2012

    Does “permanent installation” mean that it’s possible to see it live?

  • Kevin McDonagh on Jun 24, 2012

    Congratulations on this fine work!

  • Maciek on Jun 24, 2012

    It’s amazing, i am glad that people like you came to Poland :)

    Niesamowity projekt, cieszę się, że tacy ludzie działają również w moim kraju.

  • Ziggi on Jun 24, 2012

    Hi,

    I am amazed. I was born in Wrocław in 1966 and I lived nearby Centennial Hall for 26 years. Now I live in Warsaw but my heart is always with Wrocław and its unique feeling of city hugged Odra river, architectured by the greatest vissioners of their times. I dropped a tear while watching the videos. Max Berg must enjoy it in heaven! My godness – this is so powerful space…

  • Liaudet David on Jun 24, 2012

    Bonjour,
    Cela fait vraiment plaisir de te revoir ainsi Romain.
    bravo à toi et à tes équipiers pour ce très beau projet.
    David Liaudet

  • reggae rebel on Jun 23, 2012

    sorry for reducing this to the trivial…Berghain move over

  • Benjamin on Jun 21, 2012

    That is really a great project!

    As a student in virtually reality i would really like to know about the technologie you used. Like how did you calibrate the projector and are you using more the one projector? If so, you do syncronize those and calculate the right mappings if projections overlap and so on…

  • B. Moore on Jun 21, 2012

    un real……… dam I wish I could see, feel and hear this in person!

    come to America please!

    to be specific I would love to see the Gateway Arch in St. Louis MIssouri mapped with another amazing be video projection made by you and your team! here link about the Arch: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gateway_Arch

  • Jacques on Jun 20, 2012

    Belle réalisation d’antiVJ ! merci pour ce making off très beau également.

  • Greg Miernicki on Jun 20, 2012

    I would like to know how the visuals are done. Is it a series of cameras projecting images? Wonderful piece!

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